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Tears Sleepathon 2017

Date: 7 & 14 October 2017

National lottery drops SPCA

Some SPCA branches have Horse Care Units, where horses and ponies that have been abandoned
or abused are nursed back to health before being re-homed. (Roxanne Joseph, GroundUp)

A cut in funding from the national lottery has forced the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) to reduce its free services, including the work it does in poor communities.

Since its launch 62 years ago, one of the services it has offered is the care and treatment of beasts of burden, like donkeys, horses and oxen, which many people in rural and other marginalised communities depend on to work the land and for transport, according to a report on GroundUp’s website.

For the past 15 years, the SPCA and its branches across the country have received tens of millions of rands in funding from the National Lottery Commission (NLC).

But in 2017 that funding was cut after the NLC announced a shift in its focus to poverty relief, leaving the SPCA and other animal welfare organisations scrambling to make ends meet.

Marcelle Meredith, the executive director of the National Council of SPCAs, described the decision as “short-sighted and inexcusable” in a statement released at the time the NLC announced the change in its focus.

“We found out via the media that animal welfare organisations were not being considered for funding for 2016/2017,” Meg Wilson, the SPCA’s head of communications, said in an email last month.

Beneficiaries encouraged to ‘find other sources of funding’

The organisation was then informed that applications for funding within the charities sector for 2016/2017 would focus on areas aligned to the National Development Plan (NDP), which “only included helping vulnerable people and crime prevention”.

After writing to the NLC to query the decision and voice its concerns, the SPCA received this reply: “Unfortunately, animal welfare is not one of the focus areas for this year’s open call for applications, and therefore your application will not be accepted this time around. The criteria also exclude some other sectors for this call.”

“Not only does animal welfare affect communities, but the upliftment of animal welfare affects society in totality,” Wilson said, adding that the work the organisation does goes beyond animal welfare.

The NLC responded directly to the SPCA’s concerns with a statement several months after the initial announcement, which encouraged beneficiaries to “find other sources of funding so that they do not build a dependency and an entitlement to NLC funding”.

Animal welfare has once again been excluded from the next round of funding applications (2017/2018), according to an advert on the NLC’s website.

Despite this, the SPCA is applying for funding, according to Wilson.

The SPCA has adoption centres throughout the country. Some of the bigger branches deal with anywhere from 800
to 1 200 adoptions each year, which is much less than the number of animals who come in during that time.
(Roxanne Joseph, GroundUp)

Free services to the poor since 1955

“The [SPCA] does enforce the law and in some of our portfolios, we do prevention and early intervention for the vulnerable.”

The work done by the SPCA and animal welfare organisations may not seem to fit in the category of poverty relief, but the SPCA has been providing free services for the animals of poor people since 1955.

This care is not only aimed at domestic animals; the SPCA also treats and cares for beasts of burden — horses, donkeys and oxen — which their owners use to grow food, earn a living, and for transport.

They also treat cattle, sheep and goats, which people depend on for food and meat.

“Just looking at the impact that the illegal donkey skin trade has on communities, as well as the direct link between violence against animals and humans, the effect that the SPCA has in the work that it does far exceeds just animal welfare,” said Wilson.

The SPCA has adoption centres throughout the country.

The loss of such a significant source of funding has had a major impact on branches across the country, including Grahamstown, Empangeni and King William’s Town. These branches work in multiple rural communities, assisting hundreds of animals each month.

Donkey skin trade ‘detrimental’

In Grahamstown, the organisation works with a large rural community, running outreach programmes, offering vaccinations and sterilisations, visiting schools and meeting with local groups. It also works alongside other welfare organisations and local vets.

“We form connections within the communities to better understand their needs,” said centre manager Mark Thomas.

In the past year the branch has been focused on the trade of donkey skins throughout the area.

The skins are exported to China, where they are in high demand because of pseudo-scientific beliefs about their medical properties.

Thomas described the impact of the trade as “detrimental” because of the reliance of these communities on donkeys for all forms of transport.

The donkey population between Grahamstown and Peddie has been decimated and there are very few donkeys left there.

A large focus of the SPCA’s educational programmes is to teach people living on and around farms how to properly
care for the animals that are often a major source of livelihood for them and their families. (Roxanne Joseph, GroundUp)

‘Animal welfare is inextricably linked to human welfare’

But the SPCA continues to offer support to other communities and their animals, he said.

Sufficient funding has, until now, enabled the organisation — and others like it — to work in communities that are affected by the donkey skin trade, and educate people on how to properly care for their donkeys and farm animals. Communities were also educated on how to spot the signs of a possible trader.

“These donkeys are a massive part of these people’s lives,” said Tara McGovern, a spokesperson for the SPCA Cape of Good Hope branch.

“They are loyal beasts of burden, and are used for vital community activities like transport and trade.”

The decision by the NLC does not make sense because “animal welfare is inextricably linked to human welfare” and the alleviation of poverty, throughout South Africa, she said.

The national lottery has allocated R138m to animal welfare organisations since 2002, which is 1.29% of the total R10.7bn allocated in the charities category of the NLC’s funding.

‘It is a dire time for the organisation’

While NLC funding of the SPCA has varied over the past 15 years, it has remained an important source of financial support for the organisation throughout that time, with an allocation total of R128m.

The SPCA receives no funding from government and relies on lottery funding and the generosity of the public to ensure that it can continue the work it does.

Wilson said: “It is a dire time for the organisation. And although we work tirelessly to raise funds because we know that lottery is not a guarantee, without that funding, it can be detrimental to the organisation.”

The SPCA takes in more than 237 000 animals each year.

In 2017, it responded to more than 42 000 complaints of cruelty. In the past, funding from the lottery has been allocated to buying vehicles that are used to transport animals and reach outlying communities.

The funding is also used for outreach projects, property maintenance and upgrading, veterinary costs, animal handling equipment and salaries, among other expenses.

The lottery has also funded other animal welfare organisations, including The Emma Animal Rescue Society, African Tails and the Animal Anti-Cruelty League.

Source: News 24
Edited: by inFURmation

TEARS Animal Rescue Issues Urgent Covid-19 Pet Food Appeal to Assist Vulnerable Communities

Tears Covid-19 Pet food appeal

Cape Town ~ Following the announcement of the COVID-19 Lockdown and the economic impact on low income communities, TEARS Animal Rescue has launched a COVID-19 Pet Food Appeal to Cape Town based manufacturers to donate surplus edible pet food in response to the increase in requests from pet owners living in vulnerable communities as they struggle to feed their pets.

Says TEARS Animal Rescue General Manager, Lauren Carlyle, “We  cannot underestimate the impact that the COVID-19 Lockdown is having on the most vulnerable members of our society, and have therefore launched a Province-wide appeal to address what is fast becoming an animal welfare crisis. The reality is that many people have been retrenched or been put on unpaid leave for the next three weeks, which has dire consequences on the people living on or near the breadline. We’re receiving dozens of pleas for help from pet owners in vulnerable communities who say they won’t be able to feed their pets over the coming weeks.

TEARS issued a statement as part of a strategic communication campaign at the beginning of March, to emphasise the fact that animals have no direct connection with the spreading of the COVID-19 virus. Despite this, an increasing number of people have started to dump their pets after the release of fake news and misinformation surrounding the Coronavirus Pandemic. This, coupled with the fact that economic downturns always result in increased rates of pet neglect, starvation and abandonment, means that the organisation will remain on high-alert over the Lockdown period to support animals in need.  In 2018 over 500 cats and dogs were surrendered or picked-up as strays by TEARS, and last year this number increased to 683.

“Based on our experience, and as conditions continue to deteriorate, we expect to see a massive increase in the number of cats and dogs being surrendered, abandoned or left to starve as owners struggle to feed their own families. Dogs that are restrained on ropes and chains, to provide some sense of security to their owners, are often left without adequate food and care, and will most likely die slow and painful deaths, either from starvation or disease; and most often, both,’ says Carlyle.

Registered as an essential service during the Lockdown, and with its established infrastructure and operational footprint in low income communities in the Southern Peninsula of the Western Cape (namely Vrygrond, Ocean View, Redhill, and Masiphumelele), TEARS is able to collect and redistribute all pet food donations it receives to address the most critical needs in the communities it serves. Any surplus will be shared with other animal welfare organisations across Cape Town.

Says TEARS Operations Manager, Mandy Store, “We will be contacting our suppliers and partners directly with a request for assistance. All pet food donations received will be distributed to community leaders for redistribution in impoverished communities. We’ll work closely with other animal welfare organisations across Cape Town to make sure we’re able to coordinate a collective response to the increasing demand for assistance across the Province .”

While TEARS Animal Rescue will remain closed to the public for the duration of the Lockdown, it will continue to ambulance sick and injured companion animals, and rescue stray and abandoned pets within its operational footprint. In the case of emergencies only please call or SMS 071 864 4849.

TO HELP SAVE LIVES PLEASE DONATE AThttps://tears.org.za/donate/

Tears - Snap Scan

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

TEARS ANIMAL RESCUEGeneral Manager
Lauren Carlyle
Cell: 078 444 9952
Email: lauren@tears.org.za

TEARS ANIMAL RESCUEOperations Manager
Mandy Store
Call: 073 525 9191
Email: Mandy@tears.org.za

TEARS ANIMAL RESCUEMarketing Director
Lara Black
Cell: 083 326 1168
Email: lara@dreamteamworld.co.za

TEARS ANIMAL RESCUEMarketing Coordinator
Luke Kruyt
Cell: 061 722 7903
Email: luke@tears.org.za

FACT SHEET

TEARS is a Pro-Life, non-profit organization, established in 1999 (registered in terms of Section 18a of the Income Tax Act) whose core aim is to rescue, rehabilitate, reunite and rehome lost, abandoned, abused and neglected animals, and to educate the communities within which we operate, in particular the children.

We strive to meet the needs of the low-income communities in the Southern Peninsula by:

  • Providing free sterilisations, a mobile clinic,  subsidised medical support that includes vaccinations, deworming and parasite control
  • Providing a veterinary clinic on our premises, offering veterinary care for pets for almost any condition, illness or injury at a welfare rate.

We remain the only facility in the Cape Peninsula’s far-south that is available seven days a week to treat the hundreds of animals who need treatment each month for a variety of conditions, illnesses and injuries.

Our focus is on sterilisation to prevent unwanted animals from being born into a life of suffering, abuse and neglect and annually we sterilise in excess of 5 000 dogs, cats and rabbits. In addition we are one of the leading organisations in the compassionate sterilisation and management of the peninsula’s feral cat colonies through our Feral Cat Project. We feed, rehabilitate and care for up to 250 cats and dogs at our shelters. To date TEARS has homed in excess of 17 500 animals.

Source: TEARS

TEARS is having a Sleepover

TEARS

If your idea of a perfect Saturday night is to curl up with a blanket and a furbaby (or two, or three) then this event is for you! Whip out your sleeping bag and camping gear and spend a night at our shelter bunking in an enclosure with rescued dogs and cats on the 14, 21 or 28 November.

A kind gesture can reach a wound that only compassion can heal. Find out why shelter pets cuddle better, help fundraise for their future and join us for a sleepover you’ll never forget!

TEARS

Source: TEARS

Bike ride helps support TEARS animal rescue shelter

Bike ride helps support TEARS animal rescue shelter

The Deep South Lions Club hosted a charity bike ride on Sunday in an effort to source donations for TEARS. Picture: Supplied

The Newlands branch of an international club, the Deep South Lions, is patting itself on the back after a successful turnout for its annual charity bike ride in support of the The Emma Animal Rescue Society (TEARS) animal rescue shelter.

The organisation, which stretches from the Western Cape to Namibia, hosted a charity bike ride on Sunday morning to source essential items for animals currently housed at TEARS, in Masiphumelele.

Deep South Lions Club president Rory Stier said although the charity bike ride was part of the club’s annual community engagements, it was important, “almost vital”, to support those in need due to the ongoing pandemic.

“Our annual charity bike run is such an important initiative and we are more than pleased to grow and expand it each year. This year I think goods to the total of R15 000 were donated.

“The turn-out was amazing we had over 100 bikers who joined us and about 30 cars as well. People brought the animals at the shelter food and blankets. Everyone came with something for the animals, and as a club we couldn’t be happier.

“Facilitating community aid is rewarding, and we are grateful to TEARS for allowing us to continue supporting them where we can,” said Stier.

TEARS operations manager Mandy Store said: “TEARS Animal Rescue is overwhelmed by the generosity of the Deep South Lions Charity Bike Ride in support of vulnerable companion animals.”

She said twice as many supporters came out to support this year’s bike ride. “It has warmed our hearts and boosted much-needed pet food donations.

“During the Covid-19 crisis, TEARS has been actively feeding dogs and cats in the low-income communities that we support. This relief has gone a long way towards helping pet owners support their pets during a time of so much financial uncertainty and scarcity.

“A massive thank you to everyone who took part in the rally!”

Source: IOL

Parvovirus cases continue to rise in Cape Town

Image: Pixabay

Positive Parvo cases have been climbing rapidly at the TEARS Animal Rescue in Sunnydale, Cape Town. More and more positive cases give enough evidence to state that it is now an outbreak situation.

The Parvovirus is highly contagious and can last for months or even years in the environment. To help keep your pooch up and going, regular vaccinations are a must to manage these diseases.

“Covid restrictions have played a large part in restricting TEARS from reaching the communities we support in order to deliver vaccinations to pets in the area. Pet owners are financially constrained, out of work, and barely have enough means to support themselves, let alone feeding their dogs and cats and getting their vaccinations done”, says TEARS Animal Rescue Operations Manager, Mandy Store.

Parvo is also deadly and kills 95% of dogs who are unvaccinated and untreated. Some unvaccinated dogs are lucky enough to have access to expensive treatments and their chances of survival increase slightly to about 40%.  A vaccinated dog who does fall ill has nearly a 100% chance of survival unless the dog has a comorbidity.

Head TEARS Veterinarian, Dr. Tania Heuer, believes that the public needs to be educated about the importance of vaccinating when buying or adopting a pet.

“Parvovirus is a killer in waiting. Once an area has been compromised with parvovirus, we tend to see rampant infection spikes resulting in the deaths of many unvaccinated dogs and puppies. Vaccination is the key to not only preventing parvovirus but eliminating it from the community,” she says.

Parvovirus is also commonly referred to as “kat griep” or “cat flu” but as this confuses people into thinking cats are spreading the virus, which is why TEARS prefer to only refer to the disease by its causing agent, i.e the parvovirus.

Due to the virus being contagious, TEARS Welfare Clinic advises to vaccinate puppies four times, three to four weeks apart starting from as early as six weeks old. The ideal schedule remains to vaccinate all puppies at six weeks, nine weeks, and 12 weeks with the last vaccine at 16 weeks of age.

The parvovirus attacks the immune system that is also located in the puppies’ intestines, hence the general symptoms of vomiting and diarrhoea.

Symptoms of Parvo:

  • Vomiting
  • Severe, bloody diarrhoea
  • Lethargy / Listlessness (Not wanting to play with other puppies)
  • Anorexia (Not wanting to eat)
  • Fever
  • Weight loss
  • Weakness
  • Depression
  • Dehydration
  • Death

Current Challenges with positive cases:

Due to Covid-19, many animal owners can’t afford even the most basic of veterinary care and this has left our community animals at risk of infections.

A positive animal could be shedding the virus for two weeks without showing symptoms and someone believing they have a healthy puppy, may spread the virus unknowingly.

Furthermore, should a puppy contract parvo, receive treatment and survive, it can continue to shed the virus for approximately one month (articles reporting three to six weeks of active shedding).

The virus can be spread with “fomites” meaning dead materials and things like clothes and shoes could spread the virus as well, and not just the usual direct and indirect routes between dogs.

Direct virus exposure is if a puppy licks infected vomit or stool from a sick animal, and indirectly from an active shedder (smelling a recovered dog’s behind) or if being touched by an owner that may have touched another ill puppy.

Pearls of wisdom:

  • Always vaccinate your puppy (four times, three weeks apart)
  • Do not touch a stranger’s puppy and then yours without washing your hands, clothes and shoes
  • Do not take your puppy to public places until two weeks after the last vaccination at 16 weeks old (four months old)
  • Keep puppies in your yard at all times until fully vaccinated (before taking them to the beach or park)
  • DO NOT GET A NEW PUPPY if you lost a puppy to parvo for at least one YEAR
  • Do not allow unvaccinated animals into your property
  • For all dogs (and cats) continue their vaccination schedule annually (more so in highly infectious areas and closed living communities)
  • Puppy training and puppy school properties are usually considered “safe” after the secnd vaccine schedule
  • Always speak to your own veterinarian for the best advice
  • Always check on your puppy and feed it three times per day until it is six months old. By checking on your dog regularly, you can identify problems sooner and seek veterinary care at the first sign of illness. Whether the puppy is being listless, not wanting to eat, “not itself”, showing signs of vomiting or having diarrhoea.

TEARS Animal Rescue is dedicated to the prevention of disease in the low-income communities that we serve. Diseases like parvo can be prevented and eventually eliminated in areas with vaccination programmes.

Last year, TEARS vaccinated 1340 companion animals. Donate today!

Picture: Unsplash

Source: www.capetownetc.com

TEARS launches fundraising campaign aimed at easing the plight of Community Cats

TEARS launches fundraising campaign aimed at easing the plight of Community Cats

Leading pro-Life animal rescue and veterinary charity based in Sunnydale in Cape Town, TEARS Animal Rescue, has launched a fundraising campaign ahead of Christmas to raise R500,000.00 and highlight the plight of the City’s abandoned and forgotten community cats.

While TEARS sterilises and vaccinates approximately 250 community and homeless cats every month through its Community Cat Project, TEARS Operations Manager, Mandy Store stresses that there is a critical need for Government and animal welfare organisations to provide a sustained and humane solution to an issue that is marginalised and misunderstood. While it’s impossible to determine how many feral and abandoned domestic cats live in Cape Town, Store confirms that TEARS and its Mobile Clinic team receive up to 10 telephone calls every day about stray or community cats or kittens that need rescuing. 

“Since the onset of COVID19, many pet owners and families that are struggling financially, have surrendered their animals to TEARS. While many strays are lost pets that were not kept properly indoors or provided with adequate identification, many are simply abandoned and expected to fend for themselves. This is especially true for cats, “ explains Store.

TEARS is one of a few animal welfare charities that has been practising a humane Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) Programme since 2007 as a solution for community cats via the TEARS Veterinary Community Clinic in Cape Town’s Southern Peninsula. TEARS Co-Founder and Director, Marilyn Hoole, who has been a passionate crusader for community cats for the last two decades believes that more and more domestic cats are ending up abandoned and on the streets because their owners either move away or can no longer look after them.

”Thanks to the funding we receive annually from The Marchig Animal Welfare Trust and the dedicated team of volunteers who  provide monitoring and feeding support to approximately 500 community cats, we have been able to positively impact the lives of thousands of community cats by providing a sterilisation and vaccination service that enables them to enjoy a quality of life that they would otherwise never experience. Unfortunately however, we are only reaching a fraction of the number of cats that are living desperate lives, forgotten and without hope,” says Hoole.

Domesticated cats that have integrated with existing community cat colonies (there are an average of 10 to 15 cats in a colony), as a result of abandonment or abuse, succeed in diluting the feral gene-pool which makes these types of cats extremely shy, and increase the potential for these cats to be socialised and rehomed. Left to fend for themselves, and without sterilisation and vaccination, community cat colonies can quickly increase in population size and will ultimately either succumb to contagious and deadly diseases like Feline Leukaemia and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (cat FIV), or die from lack of food and malnutrition.

While law enforcement is mandated to collect healthy stray animals, residents who call to complain about a stray cat or cats in the area, are generally told to try and trap or confine the animal themselves. This is not an easy task, and in many instances TEARS has been called too late to rescue cats that have been poisoned or shot by pellet guns.

“There seems to be a negative stigma and perception that feral cats are ‘wild’ or aggressive, which is untrue. The term ‘feral’ simply means that these types of cats are undomesticated and as a result are generally afraid of people. It’s unfortunate that people don’t appreciate the valuable service provided by community cats as they control the population of rodents and other vermin that carry disease and have the potential to damage property and contaminate food,” comments Store.

TEARS asserts that while there are many animal welfare organisations that capture and euthanize community and feral cats, its neither a sustainable nor a humane solution. Sooner or later the empty habitat will either be overrun by other less beneficial species, like rats, or will be replaced by community cats from other colonies. The vacuum effect is a globally recognised scientific phenomenon that can be applied to all types of animal species. 

TEARS Head of Fundraising, Lara Van Rensburg summarises, “Our goal of raising R500 000 is an ambitious but critical one. It will literally change the lives of 1000 community cats and kittens over the course of the next four months. We’re appealing to the public to support this campaign, which we appreciate is one of many in terms of the massive need that exists in the non-profit and animal welfare sectors. However, donating to a worthy cause in  lieu of gifting someone a present that is unlikely to change the world is a great way to embrace this Season of giving back. Every donation we receive, no matter how small, will help TEARS extend its Trap-Neuter-Return Programme in the areas where it’s most needed and end the suffering of hundreds of kittens born to abandoned and feral cats this Christmas.”

Sterilisation and vaccination is a simple, essential and cost effective solution that succeeds in ending the cycle of over-population, illness, starvation and suffering that so many community cats are trapped in.

TEARS launches fundraising campaign aimed at easing the plight of Community Cats

As a recognised PBO all donations to TEARS are tax deductible. TEARS issues tax certificates according to the rules of Section 18A of the Income Tax Act (PBO No.: 930 001 672).

Source: Tears

The Forgotten Cats of Cape Town

The Forgotten Cats of Cape Town

Since the onset of COVID-19, many pet owners and families that are struggling financially, have surrendered their animals. While many strays are lost pets that were not kept properly indoors or provided with adequate identification, many are simply abandoned and expected to fend for themselves. This is especially true for cats.

It’s impossible to determine how many feral and abandoned domestic cats live in Cape Town, but TEARS receives between 5 and 10 calls every day about cats or kittens that have been abandoned or are living ‘wild’ in car parks, parks, factories, business parks and industrial sites without any food or adequate protection from the elements.  The TEARS Mobile Clinic, together with dedicated volunteers from the TEARS Feral Cat Project, enable us to sterilise and vaccinate approximately 250 community and homeless cats every month. But this is only a fraction of the number of cats that are living desperate lives, forgotten and without hope.

The Forgotten Cats of Cape Town

Basic Veterinary Care Saves Lives

TEARS is one of a few animal welfare charities that practises a humane Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) Programme as a solution for community cats. TEARS has been operating its Feral Cat Sterilisation Clinic on Wenga Farm since 2007, which is also home to our rescued cats.

The term ‘feral’ does not mean that these cats are ‘wild’ or aggressive. On the contrary, it simply means that these types of cats are undomesticated and as a result are generally afraid of people, and will do their best to avoid human contact.

Left to fend for themselves, and without sterilisation and vaccination, community cat colonies can quickly increase in population size and will ultimately either succumb to contagious and deadly diseases like Feline Leukemia and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (cat FIV), or die from lack of food.

There are many animal welfare organisations that capture and euthanise these animals, but it’s neither a sustainable nor a humane solution. Sooner or later the empty habitat will either be overrun by other less beneficial species, like rats, or will be replaced by community cats from other colonies. The vacuum effect is a globally recognised scientific phenomenon that can be applied to all types of animal species. 

The Forgotten Cats of Cape Town

Donate to the Community Cats Initiative

Our goal is to raise R500 000 ~ which will change the lives of 1000 community cats and kittens over the course of the next four months.

Your donation will help TEARS end the suffering of hundreds of kittens born to abandoned and feral cats this Christmas. Sterilisation and vaccination is a simple, essential and cost effective solution that succeeds in ending the cycle of over-population, illness, starvation and suffering that so many community cats are trapped in.

Click here to Donate to help Community Cats today!

  • R480 will cover the cost of ONE sterilisation and vaccination and allow TEARS to extend its Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) Programme in the areas where it’s most needed.
  • You can also purchase a bag of cat food to support TEARS Colony Caretakers in feeding homeless cats by clicking on this link: https://tears.org.za/product-category/donate/community-support/

Source: TEARS

TEARS Animal Rescue – Donating to support vulnerable pets can reduce your tax bill

 TEARS Animal Rescue - Donating to support vulnerable pets can reduce your tax bill

Bernie

Since the start of 2022 TEARS Animal Rescue has recorded an increase in the number of animals that need rescue and emergency veterinary treatment.  The Charity is appealing to individuals and especially corporate donors to consider making a tax-free donation to the TEARS Veterinary Outreach and Mobile Clinic Fund before the end of the financial year, entitling donors to enjoy a reduction on their income tax bill.

Says TEARS Head of Fundraising, Lara Van Rensburg. “ Most people think of TEARS as a Kennel and Cattery but by far the most critical service of TEARS, and the beating heart of its’ outreach and animal welfare operation, are the TEARS Mobile Clinic and TEARS Veterinary Hospital which together are responsible for the rescue and treatment of up to 100 animals every month. We spend just over R6,18M on veterinary treatment and community outreach per annum. Without the financial support we receive from individuals, Trusts and Foundations, corporates, and via Bequests, TEARS would not have survived the lean times or the impact of COVID-19 on its ability to fundraise or generate income to support the hardest hit and the most vulnerable in impoverished communities. As a recognised Level 1 B-BBEE contributor and Public Beneficiary Organisation all donations to TEARS are tax deductible, with donors receiving a Section 18A tax receipt, allowing them to claim the applicable tax relief.”

The TEARS Veterinary Clinic operates with three veterinarians and support staff including Animal Welfare Assistants and orderlies, and sees an average of 50-60 patients per day, which include sterilisations, scheduled and emergency surgeries and a variety of assessments and tests that range from blood work, X-rays and ultra-sounds. The number of cases the TEARS Mobile Clinic and Hospital is processing on a weekly and monthly basis has escalated significantly since the onset of Lockdown, as a direct consequence of the rising unemployment levels and resulting deprivation and hardship that is being experienced by people and pets.

 TEARS Animal Rescue - Donating to support vulnerable pets can reduce your tax bill

Tracker with his rescuer recovering well

‘Bernie Mack’, as he’s affectionately known, is a 5-year old Terrier-Cross who came to TEARS earlier this month after a child allegedly threw boiling water over the dog. By the time the TEARS Mobile Clinic was called out to attend to him, it was five days after the incident had taken place and Bernie had sustained second degree burns over half of his body. Thanks to the TEARS Veterinary team, he received emergency wound and burn treatment together with pain relief medication before going into a high-care environment where he is rehabilitating well and being exposed to lots of TLC from the TEARS Kennel team.

Homeless 7-year old German Shepard Cross, ‘Tracker’ was rescued by TEARS with limited odds of surviving. After being run over by a train on 14 January, which amputated his left hind leg, tail and both testes, most people would have judged his chances of recovering as something akin to a miracle. Thanks to his rescuers and TEARS and Noordhoek Veterinarian Dr Tracy Dicks, who consults to TEARS, Tracker’s will to live paid off and he’s recovering well in a loving home-environment with TEARS Kennel Manager, Luke Kruyt, until he can be fully rehabilitated and adopted into a forever home.

Says TEARS Operations Manager, Mandy Store, “TEARS is symbolic of second chance stories like Bernie’s and Tracker’s. The TEARS Veterinary Hospital treats a variety of lethal and non-lethal animal-borne diseases including skin diseases, erhlichiasis, distemper, canine parvovirus, feline herpes virus, as well as bite and stab wounds, burns, and blunt force trauma that many pets sustain as a result of motor vehicle accidents (hit and runs) or being beaten or trodden on! It costs TEARS approximately R 515,000 per month to operate our Hospital and Mobile Clinic and provide the welfare and rescue services we do across the Southern Cape Peninsula.”

For the 2020/21 period, TEARS rescued 727 pets; vaccinated 3 314 animals; sterilised 6 091 animals, plus another 3 314 feral and community cats, which were sterilised, treated and released; and treated 6 720 injured and sick animals at the TEARS Veterinary Hospital, which included 3 432 vet  consultations. 

TEARS Animal Rescue - Donating to support vulnerable pets can reduce your tax bill

TEARS Veterinary Clinic

Please donate to the TEARS Veterinary Outreach and Mobile Clinic Fund today or visit www.tears.org.za/basic-animal-health-care/ for more information.

An investment in TEARS will ensures that its’ rescue, treatment, rehabilitation and rehoming teams can continue to operate, and give more animals like Bernie and Tracker the “second chances” they deserve.

Source: TEARS

TEARS launches fundraising campaign to vaccinate more pets against deadly virus

TEARS vaccination campaign

TEARS Animal Rescue, based in Sunnydale, is currently being inundated with pet owners seeking help for unvaccinated puppies that have been infected by the lethal Canine Distemper Virus (CDV or Distemper).

This highly contagious airborne virus, mainly affects the respiratory, gastrointestinal and neurological systems, includes symptoms like fever and diarrhoea before spreading to the brain and resulting in death. Because there is no cure for the disease, and based on its high contagiousness, the standard animal welfare response, mandated by the SPCA, is to euthanise any dog that is diagnosed with Distemper.

Says TEARS Head Veterinarian, Dr Tania Heuer, “Distemper, together with Canine Parvo Virus, are two of the most Tears Fundraising Campaigninfectious diseases to dogs. We have a monumental responsibility to prevent the spread of the disease in our communities, and a high euthanasia rate in cases where a dog tests positive for the virus. The most important thing any pet owner can do for their pet, is to make sure they’re fully vaccinated. Distemper is avoidable if puppies are vaccinated early.”

One vaccination at 6 weeks, another again at 9 weeks, and then preferably a third vaccine at 12 weeks (3 months) will provide sufficient protection from the virus.  Adult dogs only require two vaccines one month apart.

TEARS vaccinates as many as 350 vulnerable pets per month, providing sterilisations and the first vaccine for free to its welfare clients living in Masiphumelele, Capricorn, Ocean View and Red Hill.  

While many pet owners are without access to transport, TEARS operates a Mobile Clinic service seven days per week, collecting animals from these four communities and taking them into the TEARS Veterinary Hospital for treatment, before returning them. Despite this, many welfare pet owners neglect to vaccinate their puppies or never receive their booster vaccines as required.

Tears Fundraising Campaign“Many pet owners continue to have an anti-vaccination and anti-sterilisation mentality,” says Dr Heuer. “We cannot force owner responsibility on anyone.“

TEARS Head of Fundraising, Lara Van Rensburg comments, “TEARS desperately needs funding support for its Veterinary Outreach Programme to vaccinate more animals and prevent more unnecessary deaths. It costs us R63,000.00 to vaccinate 350 animals, but the vaccination status of pets remains low relative to the need. Homeless and abandoned animals that are more susceptible to infection roam freely, which, combined with the overcrowded conditions in these low-income communities, means the spread of the virus is an ongoing challenge. Pet owners who neglect to vaccinate their animals realise the dangers of not vaccinating, too late. The incubation period of the virus is between three and six days and by the time symptoms appear after exposure, it’s too late.”

Capetonians can help by donating towards TEARS’ Veterinary Outreach Fund enabling the TEARS Mobile Clinics to continue their sterilisation and vaccination drives and protect more animals.

To donate please click here:  https://tears.devman.co.za/devman/online/vetoutreach/ or visit www.tears.org.za

TEARS is a recognised Level 1 B-BBEE contributor and Public Beneficiary Organisation. Donations to TEARS are tax deductible, with donors receiving a Section 18A tax receipt.

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:
TEARS HEAD of Fundraising
Lara Van Rensburg
Cell: 083 326 1168
Email: lara@tears.org.za